Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Mary Boone Gant & Boone Family

Probably you have heard about Daniel Boone - pioneer, frontiersman, Revolutionary War hero, founder of the village named Boonesborough, which was one of the very first settlements in Kentucky (Virginia then). Maybe you have also heard about his brother Squire, who was quite a person as well. Well, they are our indirect relatives, related to our family via Mary Gant nee Boone.
Daniel Boone was Mary's second cousin twice removed.

Daniel Boone

Wish I had a photograph of Mary's portrait bus since I do not have one, I can only include the image of her cousin's.

Here is the family line which connects the two of them:

Mary Gant (Boone)
her father Hiram Boone (b. 1765, Culpepper County, Virginia - d. 13 March 1826, Woodford, Kentucky) ➦
his father Hezekiah Boone ( 22 May 1735, Exeter, Berks, PA - 20 Dec. 1823, Woodford, Kentucky) ➦
his father George Boone (13 July 1690, Bradninch, Devonshire, England - 20 Nov. 1753, Exeter Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania) ➦
his brother Squire Maugridge Boone, Sr. (25 Nov. 1696, Bradninch, Devonshire, England - 2 Jan. 1765, Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina, Colonial America) ➦
his son Daniel Boone ( 2 Nov. 1734, Birdsboro near Reading, Oley Valley, Berks County, Province of Pennsylvania, Colonial America - 26 Sept. 1820, Nathan Boone's house, Defiance, Femme Osage Creek, St. Charles County, Missouri).

Miss Mary Boone connects us to quite a few other family lines/branches including such surnames as Eisenhower, Mitchell, Stover, Grant, Van Bibber, Evans, Sanders, Scott, Hays, Scholl, Mead, Hughes, Bennett, Patterson, Hulings, Whitaker, Thomas, Milton, Powell, and Moulton (to mention only the main ones). I am going to tell you more about some of those connections. Therefore, I think Mary and her immediate family need to be introduced here in a more detailed way.

Mary Boone was born on 26 May 1803 in Columbia, Adair, Kentucky to Hiram Boone and Lucy Ann Smith.

On 15 October 1822, Mary married our cousin six times removed Absalom Bobo Gant, son of Lewis Bobo Gant and Mary Armstrong. It happened in Clifton, Wayne County, Tennessee. Absalom Bobo was born on 25 February 1800 in Abbeville, Abbeville County, South Carolina.
Mary and Absalom had eleven children - seven daughters and four sons.

Daughters of Absalom and Mary's

  • Lucy Ann - born 3 April 1824 in Stantonville, Harding, Tennessee/died 8 October 1875 in Hardin, TN. Lucy married Mr. E.A. Polk (around 1844 in Wayne Co., TN);
  • Elizabeth Jane - b. 19 June 1826, Stantonville, Hardin Co, TN/d. 10 Dec. 1910, Weatherford, Parker Co, TX). On 2 Sept. 1826 in Clifton, Wayne Co., Tennessee, Elizabeth married  Thomas Jefferson Kindel (b.17 Nov. 1824) - Texas connection;
  •  Mary Huldah - b. 10 Dec. 1834, Martin, Weakley, TN/d. 25 April 1859 in Wayne, TN. Mary married Bruce Childress (b. around 1930);
  • Nancy Emarintha - b. 19 Oct. 1837 in Martin Mills, Wayne, Tennesse/d. 19 May 1920 in Temple, Bell, Texas. On 25 Sept. 1850 Nacy married Mr. W. H. A. Atkins (born 1833) - Texas connection;
  • Irene (Martha J) - b. 6 Feb. 1840, Martin Mills, Wayne, Tennesse/d. 10 Feb. 1896 in Wayne, TN;
  • Frances Elizabeth - b. 10 March 1842 in Martin Mills, Wayne, Tennesse/d. 13 March 1922 in Texas. Buried - old Kindel lot, Weatherford cemetery, Parker Co, TX -  Texas connection;
  •  Sarah Emma - b. 20 July 1840 in - Martin Mills, Wayne, Tennesse/d. 8 June 1846 in Gainesville, Cook Co., Texas - ⭐ Texas connection. Sarah got married on 12 Oct. 1869. Her husband was James Webb Montague (b. 15 Nov. 1846).

 

Sons of Absalom and Mary's

  • Louis Boone Gant - b. 10 July 1828 TN/d. 25 Nov. 1865 in Wayne County, TN). In 1853 Louis married Miss Evaline Lina Parker (b. 1832);
  • William Miles - b. 16 Jan. 1831 in Stantonville, Harding, Tennessee/d. 11 Feb. 1863 in TN. On 1 March 1857 he married Miss Sarah Croder (b. 1834);
  • Absalom Bobo Gant, Jr. - b. 30 Oct. 1832, Martin, Weakley, TN/d. 2 May 1892, Graham, Young County, Texas. Absalom married Miss Julia Minerva Raines (b. 15 Sept. 1837) on 18 Dec. 1867 in Rusk, Cherokee Co, TX - Texas connection;
  • Frances - b. 1843 in Tennessee.
Mary's husband Absalom Bobo passed on the day of her 73rd birthday, on 26 May 1876 in Clifton, Wayne, Tennessee. Mary Gant departed twenty years later, on 8 August 1896, in Martin Mills, Wayne, Tennessee.
The couple was buried at Mount Hebron Cemetery, Houston, Wayne Co., TN.

You can read more about Mary's son Absalom Bobo Gant, Jr., his ancestors and children in one of my previous posts.

Credits:
Photo of Daniel Boone: Chester Harding
[Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons;
Photo of gravestone: Judy Griffin;

Information based on MyHeritage research.


Monday, March 26, 2018

Thomas Gant - English Roots

Thomas Gant (our 7 times-great-grandfather) was born on 27 July 1667, in Northamptonshire, England. His parents were Thomas Gent and Sarah Newton.


Thomas married a few times. One of his wives and the mother of his son John was Mary Jennings (born 30 May 1668 — died 21 Feb. 1724, in Charles City, VA). Unfortunately, it is not known when Thomas came to America. He died on 22 April 1721, in Charles City, Prince George Co., Virginia, when he was only 53 years old.


Thomas' son John Gent, our 6 times-great-grandfather, was born in Charles City, Prince George Co., Virginia, on 11 April 1687. In 1717, John purchased land from Richard Washington, who, like John's father, also used to live in England in Northamptonshire.

On 22 June 1708, 21-year-old John married 38-year-old Sarah Boone (born 17 July 1670, in Biddulph, Staffordshire, England), daughter of John Boone and Mary Harper. Well, there was quite a big age difference between the spouses.
John passed in Isle of Wight, VA, on 3 December 1727.

Credits:
England flag by abFlags.com cc: by nc sa  


Our Connection to Luckenbach Family

If you asked us what our favorite part of Texas is, the answer would be: "Hill Country".

If you wanted to know which part of Hill Country - we would say: "Fredericksburg. And Luckenbach."

Fredericksburg, Gillespie County, TX - 'our fountain'

Fredericksburg is quite a special town, whenever I am there, I always feel as if I was close to my home place in Poland. Maybe because, despite being situated in the heart of Texas, Fredericksburg  seems to have such a European spirit which is close to my heart. Another reason for that may be the fact that the town was founded by German immigrants, and Germany borders Poland. Or maybe it is part of my DNA inherited after some of the ancestors who were born and lived in the area of Poland which had been taken over by Prussia. Who knows.


Luckenbach is quite a place of its own kind. Once, we almost got married there - well, we could have (I wrote about that and our visit in Luckenbach here).


Among the twenty thousand and fifty-one persons (yes, 20 051 - a lot of ancestors to write about!) whom I found in our extended family tree the ones who are less or more known from history books, housewives, businessmen, farmers, politicians, army men (privates and generals), followers of different religions, presidents and quite average individuals as well. Quite unexpectedly, I recently also came across a Luckenbach family and our connection to them.

To be more specific:

First I found Mr. Rufus Monroe Angel - our third cousin once removed. Rufus was born on November 26, 1892, in Denton, Texas, died April 28, 1960, in San Antonio, Texas. His parents were James Monroe Angel/Anglea and Leanner Catherone Brock.

Then, it was Elizabeth Hart, daughter of Charle H Hart and Emilie Biesenbach. Emilie was born in San Antonio, Bexar, Texas, on June 21, 1892.

Rufus and Elizabeth got married in 1924.

Texas, County Marriage Records, 1837-1965
Name: R M Angel
Event Type: Marriage
Event Date: 18 Jun 1924
Event Place: Bexar, Texas, United States
Gender: Male
Spouse's Name: Elizabeth Hart
Spouse's Gender: Female
Page: 638

Record Source:
"Texas, County Marriage Records, 1837-1965," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K61G-GW3 : accessed 23 March 2018), R M Angel and Elizabeth Hart, 18 Jun 1924, Marriage; citing Bexar, Texas, United States, various county clerk offices, Texas State Library and Archives Commission, Texas Dept. of State Health Services and Golightly-Payne-Coon Co.; FHL microfilm 24,949.

Elizabeth's sister and Rufus' sister-in-law was Jeannie Katherine Hart born on December 20, 1887, in Bexar, Texas.

Jeannie married Mr. Louis Carl Luckenbach (born in Willow City, Gillespie County, Texas, on October 25, 1885*).

Louis' parents were Friedrich Wilhelm Luckenbach (born September 14, 1823 in Stein-Neukirch, Hessen-Nassau, Prussia and Anna Katherina Kallenberg, born on Oct. 29, 1839 in Saxony, Germany).

According to the online Handbook of Texas, Friedriech Wilhelm came to America on the ship Johann Dethardt, at the end of December in 1845. He was accompanied by his brothers and three sisters: 6 years older Albert Jacob b. Oct 6 1817, Duchy of Nassau, Germany), Friedrich August (b. March 7, 1833, Prussia), Juliane (b. Feb 10, 1827, Prussia), and Henriette (b. Oct 13, 1829, Prussia).

Fredericksburg - the building of the Pioneers' Museum
I am not sure whether the third sister was Wilhelmine (b. Oct. 12, 1820) or Lottie (born circa 1838). Considering how old they both were at that time, it seems it more likely that it was Wilhelmine. Probably, Lottie came to Texas later with their mother Anne Elizabeth (born Oct 24, 1791, Stein, Marienberg, Hesse-Nassau, Prussia). Very likely, it was after the death of Anne's husband and the father of her children Johannes peter Luckenbach (b. July 29, 1784 - d. Jan 14, 1849 in Stein, Marienberg, Hesse-Nassau, Prussia). My assumption is based on the fact that Anne Elisabeth died in Fredericksburg, TX on Oct. 18, 1888 (the information found on MyHeritage).

The Luckenbach family, including 'our' Wilhelm Friedreich, Louis' father, were some of the first settlers in Fredericksburg. They became American citizens in 1852 and not long after that, the family moved to the area which is called Luckenbach.


How cool it is to find out it all thanks to my own research!

Coming back to our connection to the Luckenbach family - on July 22, 1885, Friedriech Wilhelm Luckenbach married Anne Katherine Kallenberg in Fredericksburg (where we did marry many, many years later). Anne Katherine was a daughter of Mr. Johannes Heinrich Kallenberg.

Louis Carl was the youngest and the 12th child of Friedreich and Anne's. He had blue eyes and light brown hair.**

Except of Carl, they also had six sons: Ernst (about 1856), Charles F (1860), Freidrich (about 1863), Paul (1867), Max William (1869), and Wilhelm (1879), and five daughters: Louisa L (1858), Paulina (1863), Emma L (1872), Anna Elise (1874), and Louise Mina (1877).

Louis married at the age of 27. His bride 22-year-old Miss Jeannie Katherine Hart on September 19, 1909, in Bexar County, TX. She was born on December 20, 1880, in Bexar, TX to Miss Charles H Hart and Ms. Emilie Biesenbach.

The couple had four children:

Hazel Anna (1910 - 1912 died of scarlatin),

Record Source:
"Texas Deaths, 1890-1976," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K3WP-G57 : 13 March 2018), Hazel Anna Luckenbach, 25 Jun 1912; citing certificate number 14387, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,050,830.


Everest Alexander (1913-2001),

Beatrice Emilie (1915-1918) - died of diphtheria,

"Texas Deaths, 1890-1976," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K3ZP-PL3 : 13 March 2018), Beatrice Emilie Luckanbach, 14 Aug 1918; citing certificate number 30483, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,073,268.

Olive Hazel (1916-2002).


In 1919 Louis and Jeannie lived in La Coste, Medina, TX. Louis worked as Hard Ward & Implement Dealer at Luckenbach H.D. & I. Co.**

Registration Card
Serial Number: 196 Order Number: 665
Name: Louis Carl Luckenbach
Permanent Home Address: La Coste Medina Tex.
Age in Years: 35
Date of Birth: October 25 1882
Race
White: Yes
US Citizen
Native Born: Yes
Present Occupation: Hard Ward & Implement Dealer
Employer's name: Luckenbach H.D. & I. Co.

Place of Employment or Business: La Coste Medina Texas
Nearest Relative: Jeannie Luckenbach Adress: La Coste Medina State: Texas
Registrar's Report: 42-1-54-C
Description of Registrant
Height: Medium, Build: Slender, Color of Eyes: Blue, Color of Hair: L.Brown

Signed: Thomas H Brickett
Date of Registration: Sep 9, 1918

Stamp: Local Board for the County
             of Medina, State of Texas
             Hondo, Texas 

Record Source:
"United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KZXL-76N : 13 March 2018), Louis Carl Luckenbach, 1917-1918; citing Medina County, Texas, United States, NARA microfilm publication M1509 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,983,489.


In 1942, the family had already lived at 119 Nelson St. in San Antonio, TX. Probably he ran a hardware store.

Registration Card 9
Serial Number: 1405
Name: Louis Carl Luckenbach
Place of Residence: 119 Nelson St, San Antonio, Bexar,Texas

Mailing Address: Same
Age in Years: 59
Date of Birth: October 25 1882
Place of Birth: Willow City, Texas
Name And Address of Person Who Will Always Know Your Address: Mrs. Jeannie Luckenbach, 119 Nelson St., San Antonio, Tx.
Employer's Name And Address: Self - 119 Nelson St., San Antonio, Texas
Place of Employment or Business: 812 Comerce St., San Antonio, Bexar, Texas
Signature: Louis Carl Luckenbach


Record Source
"United States World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XP53-GX3 : 6 November 2017), Louis Carl Luckenbach, 1942; citing NARA microfilm publication M1936, M1937, M1939, M1951, M1962, M1964, M1986, M2090, and M2097 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

Louis died at Normady Terrace Nursing Home in San Antonio when he was 70 at 8:45 PM on Feb. 20, 1975. He was buried at Roselawn Memorial Park.***


Louis Carl Luckenbach
⇒ his wife Jeannie Katherine Hart
⇒ her sister Elizabeth (Hart) Angel
⇒ her husband Rufus Monroe Angel - our 5rd cousin once removed
⇒ his father James Monroe Angel
⇒ his mother Elizabeth Sarah (Gant) Angel
⇒ her father Benjamin Thomas Gant
⇒ his brother Jacob Rippy Gant - our great-great-grandfather


Source:
The Handbook of Texas
familysearch.org
*Texas Births and Christenings, 1840-1981," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F6P9-724 : 11 February 2018), Louis Carl Luckenbach, 25 Oct 1882; citing Gillespie Co., Texas, reference item 5 p 135; FHL microfilm 1,764,046.
** "United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KZXL-76N : 13 March 2018), Louis Carl Luckenbach, 1917-1918; citing Medina County, Texas, United States, NARA microfilm publication M1509 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,983,489.
*** "Texas Deaths, 1890-1976," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KSYR-PB6 : 13 March 2018), Louis C Luckenbach, 20 Feb 1975; citing certificate number 07226, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,243,682.
Photo of gravestone: Mr. Emry Schnuriger




Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Mom's WW2 Stories: Red Box

Some time after the war officially ended, mom got a new pair of shoes. Well, not from a store as footwear was still not available in regular shops. A lady who lived in the neighborhood presented them to mom. The shoes used to belong to the woman's daughter but the girl no longer needed them. No, not because she grew out of them. She just did not need them anymore.

Why?

One day the girl played out together with three boys. They found an unexploded bomb, maybe they tried to move it or just trifled with it, nobody knows. Anyhow, the bomb went off and all the kids were killed. And the girl did not need those shoes anymore.

One day, mom and her friend R, a girl around her age, were walking to a girl scouts meeting. The girls were talking and playing, chasing each other from time to time. Suddenly R noticed something on the road, close to the pavement.

"Ah, what a nice red box!", she cried.

The box looked lovely indeed. It was small, red, round and shiny. Like a cute little gift waiting there to be found.

"Kick it!", mom said to her friend.

And R did. At the very same moment the nice, red, and shiny box turned into a blast - fire, and shrapnel. The former one hit R who ignited the detonation with the kick. Mom got all the shrapnel.

Instead of reaching the girl scouts meeting point, the two girls were rushed to a nearby hospital. R was injured, one of her legs was terribly burned. Mom had pieces of metal stuck in her eyes, chest, legs, and arms.

R's burns were treated but her leg got crippled in the result of the injuries. However, according to the doctors, the disability was possibly temporary if the follow-up physical therapy would be exerted at home. R was released from the hospital. Mom does not know whether the girl's leg was treated/exercised afterward. Probably it was not as R limped since then and her condition never improved.

Mom (a few-year-old girl at the time) spent quite a long time at the hospital. Nevertheless not much was done to help her. The girl's body was powdered every day and covered with paper bandages. Mom says it was toilet paper - well, possibly it was, I guess, the hospital supply was rather poor those days. Anyway, her condition was getting worse, she could not see either - her eyes were seriously wounded. As for the only effective treatment, the doctors suggested removing both mom's eyes and her left leg. The limb - not cleansed but powdered only - was hit with gangrene. Fortunately, mom's mother did not agree to that radical procedure and took her little girl back home.

Not only mom's leg but her entire body, covered with powder, was in a terrible condition. Grandma started treating her daughter on her own. The lady bought kali hyper manganicum in a pharmacy. The tiny purple crystals which are to be dissolved in some amount of water have antiseptic properties (they are still available without a prescription in Poland - to be used on the body surface only).

Anyway, grandma cleansed her daughter's body and started removing the shrapnel pieces from her arms and legs with sterilized tweezers . Mom recalls it was all very painful. Her mother patiently took out a few bits of metal at a time. However, she did not try to touch the ones which were stuck too deep in the girl's eyes and chest. Grandma's care and the kali manganicum washes saved mom and her left leg. Even though the convalescence lasted long. Mom's eyes healed and the vision in her right eye came back. Thanks to grandma her daughter could live and play as she had before the calamitous incident.

What stayed with mom was the shrapnel which could not be removed and the thought which has bothered her all her life: "If I had not told R to kick that box, nothing would have happened to her".

I advised mom to consider something else. Very likely, if her friend had not kicked that red box, attracted by the look of the item, she would have possibly picked it up and tried to open it. The result of that would have been even more tragic then. Possibly, she actually saved her friend's life.

The war was over, life was slowly coming back to normal but such (often lethal) accidents happened almost every day. People who were lucky to survive WW2 died or got seriously injured due to booby traps, delayed bomb, and missile explosions.

Mom and her mom - picture taken during the war
 
More Mom's WW2 Stories

Thursday, March 15, 2018

Wywiady Klubowe: Rozmowa z Weroniką

Po ponad miesięcznej przerwie, dzisiaj kolejny wywiad Klubu Polki. Zapraszamy do przeczytania tego, co opowiedziała nam o sobie nasza klubowa Koleżanka Weronika.

Weroniko, gdzie jest Twoje miejsce w Polsce?

Tam, gdzie jest moja rodzina – rodzice, siostra z rodziną, tam jest moje miejsce w Polsce. Pochodzę z Małego Trójmiasta Kaszubskiego i to właśnie te okolice. Otoczenie, w którym dorastałam, poznawałam świat, a także siebie, chyba na zawsze zostanie najbliższe mojemu sercu. Niestety podczas mojej nieobecności czas nie staje w miejscu i po każdym powrocie zastaję zmiany. Nie zawsze potrafię sobie z tym od razu poradzić. Lubię wspominać… Zabrzmiało jak wyznania staruszki, a do „poważnego” wieku jeszcze trochę mi brakuje.


Jak dawno temu wyjechałaś z Polski?

Z Polski wyjechałam jesienią 2014 roku. Przez 3 lata mieszkałam w Szwajcarii, a we wrześniu ubiegłego roku przeprowadziłam się do Włoch.

Jakie były kraje oraz przyczyna Twojej emigracji?

Po siedmiu latach bycia w związku na odległość, wraz z moim partnerem postanowiliśmy w końcu spróbować pobyć ze sobą na co dzień. Sprawdzić, czy faktycznie jesteśmy sobie przeznaczeni, czy sterta brudnych naczyń, rachunki do opłacenia i szara codzienność są w stanie nas pokonać. Poznaliśmy się, gdy ja rozpoczynałam studia, a on był w trakcie swoich. Wcześniej nie było możliwości, aby spróbować wspólnego życia. Dziś jesteśmy po ślubie i mamy córeczkę. Warto było zaryzykować!

Jakie masz wykształcenie?

Z wykształcenia jestem Architektem Krajobrazu, a także Florystką. Przed wyjazdem z Polski zajmowałam się jednym i drugim. Niestety po przeprowadzce nie miałam okazji kontynuować pracy w swoim zawodzie.


Czym zajmujesz się na co dzień?

Obecnie jestem mamą na pełen etat. Dwa miesiące po narodzinach córki musieliśmy się przeprowadzić. Był to zarówno najszczęśliwszy i najtrudniejszy okres w naszym życiu. Malutkie dziecko, nowy kraj, język… Trzeba było od początku wypracować sobie naszą codzienność. Powoli wszystko zaczyna się układać, uspokajać (jeśli można tak powiedzieć przy ośmiomiesięcznym wulkanie energii), a ja po cichutku zaczynam myśleć o zawodowej sferze mojego życia.

Jakie masz hobby, co lubisz robić w czasie wolnym?

Zawsze ciągnęło mnie do kreatywnych zajęć. Po wyjeździe z Polski bardzo często czułam się samotna. Brak pracy, bliskości rodziny i przyjaciół źle wpływały na mój nastrój. Pewnego razu zakupiłam włóczkę i postanowiłam nauczyć się szydełkować. Pierwsze prace wykonywałam z dokładnymi filmikami instruktażowymi. Obecnie szydełkuję głównie lalki i maskotki według własnych pomysłów. Drugą moją wielką pasją, do której wróciłam po latach, jest malowanie. Chyba miałam pewien uraz po studenckich czasach, a teraz na nowo coraz bardziej zakochuję się w akwarelach.


Z czego jesteś dumna?

Dumna jestem ze swojej rodziny – córki, męża, a także siebie. Nie zawsze jest łatwo - tu sami w obcym mieście, ale jakoś sobie radzimy. Jesteśmy szczęściarzami, że mamy siebie.

Kiedy zaczęłaś pisać bloga / o czym piszesz na blogu?

Bloga zaczęłam pisać w sierpniu 2015 roku. Miało być to takie moje „miejsce” w wirtualnym świecie, gdzie chciałam spisywać relacje z podróży, publikować szydełkowe prace i pisać na dowolne tematy. Publikowałam regularnie do czasu narodzin córki. Od lipca zeszłego roku panuje pewien przestój. Powoli dojrzewam do pewnych decyzji, które już nie długo zacznę wprowadzać w życie. Zderzyłam się z rzeczywistością i ze względu na brak czasu jestem zmuszona zmienić dotychczasową formę. Obecnie Instagram skradł moje serce i na nim jestem najbardziej aktywna.


 Czym jest dla Ciebie Klub Polki?

Do Klubu dołączyłam stosunkowo niedawno, bo w lutym ubiegłego roku. Ze względu na sytuację w życiu osobistym niestety na razie nie mogłam dać z siebie tyle, ile chciałam. Jak zaczęłam wracać do wirtualnego świata, to w Klubie zaczęły się zmiany. Z tych powodów na razie stoję z boku i obserwuję. A zresztą taki mam też charakter. Niemniej jednak dobrze jest mieć poczucie przynależności do grupy wspaniałych, inspirujących i życzliwych osób, które tak jak ja przekonali się na własnej skórze, jak to jest zamienić to, co się zna od podszewki, na zupełnie obce.

Co jeszcze chciałabyś nam powiedzieć o sobie?

Chciałabym prosić o trzymanie kciuków, aby spełniły się moje marzenia związane z życiem zawodowym. A w podziękowaniu życzyć jak najwięcej pięknych i słonecznych dni!



WERONIKA PIETRUSZKA 

Strony Weroniki:
Blog Werka Tu i Tam
Instagram
Facebook

Weroniko, dziękujemy za rozmowę i trzymamy kciuki!

Przy okazji zapraszamy też do odwiedzenia portalu Polki na Obczyźnie (Klub Polki w nowych szatach), który miał swoją premierę ósmego marca - w Dniu Kobiet - tego roku.


Zdjęcia ilustrujące wywiad: Weronika Pietruszka


Monday, March 12, 2018

Ledbetter Ancestors

Some time ago, I wrote about our direct ancestor Jurita Elizabeth Ledbetter. Since then I found some information regarding Jurita's father's possible siblings and ancestors.

Jurita's grandparents:

Grandfather: Moses Ledbetter, born circa 1813, in Rutheford County, Davidson County, TN.

In 1840*, Moses lived in Georgia in Cumming, Forsyth, Georgia.

Moses moved from South Carolina to Georgia with his uncle Johnson Ledbetter and Moses' mother Mary "Polly" Ledbetter nee Whiteside. Probably, it was before Moses got married.

Grandmother: Mary "Pollie" Hammon - born circa 1820 in NC, died around 1870 in GA.

Moses and Mary married** on July 12, 1831 in Hall, Georgia.

Georgia Marriages, 1808-1967
Name: Moses Ledbetter
Spouse's Name: Mary Hammon
Event Date: 12 Jul 1831
Event Place: Hall, Georgia


Jurita's father Charles, born in 1833, was the first child of Moses and Mary's Ledbetter. Cherles had three brothers and five sisters.

According to the information found on MyHeritage, Charle's father Moses fought in the second Seminole War in 1830s. He was a member of the Beaver Ruin Baptist Church.

Moses Ledbetter was said to be one of those men who were part of California Gold Rush in 1849 and also got rich then. He buried the gold in a secret place not known to his family members.

Later, after 1851, he worked as a lumberjack. Moses died suddenly on Feb. 3, 1855, due to a logging accident, in Hurricane Creek, Forsyth, Cherokee, GA. His family did not have a clue where the family treasure (the gold) had been hidden. Moses' heritage got lost forever.

Jurita'sgreat-grandparents

Great-grandfather : Richard B Ledbetter IV (1779, Montford Cove, Rutheford, NC - Feb. 1859, Harris, NC),
Great-grandmother: Mary "Polly" Whiteside (Aug. 13, 1783, Buffalo Creek, Rutheford, NC - Oct. 30, 1870, Gasper, Pickens, Georgia).



I tried to trace other Ledbetter men (besides Jurita's father Charles) who came to Texas in the 1800s. So far, I "found" only one - Lewis Johnson Ledbetter (b. Feb. 10, 1840 in Alabama), son of Whilliam Whittenton Ledbetter. Lewis Johnson was Charles' second cousin. He lived in Georgia but must have moved to Texas by 1869 as Alsey, one of his daughters, was born in Texas, in 1869. The child did not survive - the girl is not mentioned in the later records.

In 1880 the family of Lewis Ledbetter (a farmer) and his wife Nancy Jackson (35) lived in Precinct 7, in Johnson, TX (Census 1880***). The record says that two of their sons Alvarado (13) and Oswald (11) were farm workers already. Did they have anything to do with the town Ledbetter in Fayette County, Texas? Well, maybe - I found the grave marker of little F. A. Ledbetter, born in 1869, died 1871. The little girl could be Alsey. Anyway, she was buried in La Grange, Fayette County.


Source:
MyHeritage;
familysearch.org;

* "United States Census, 1840," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHBN-7M9 : 15 August 2017), Moses Ledbetter, Cumming, Forsyth, Georgia, United States; citing p. 287, NARA microfilm publication M704, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 41; FHL microfilm 7,043.

**"Georgia Marriages, 1808-1967," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FWHC-GYH : 11 February 2018), Moses Ledbetter and Mary Hammon, 12 Jul 1831; citing , Hall, Georgia; FHL microfilm 424,630.

*** "United States Census, 1880," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MFNP-KS5 : 15 July 2017), J Ledbetter, Precinct 7, Johnson, Texas, United States; citing enumeration district ED 87, sheet 393A, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 1313; FHL microfilm 1,255,313. 

findagrave.com


Tuesday, March 6, 2018

William Barrett Travis and David Stern Crockett

When I finished my research connected with our main ancestry line, I started working on the side branches of the family tree. From one person to another I gradually, I discovered many horizontal family line and connections which spread in various directions. The research in a way reminded looking for the beads of a very large necklace which had got broken many years ago. The ancestors are like those beads, and I was always happy when I managed to find one of them and "put" in the right spot.

Nonetheless, it is always a sort of blind search and, doing that,  you never know what kind of surprise you are (or are not) to discover. Many times I have come across a surname which looked like the surname of a person who became famous because of various reasons. In such cases, I tried to find as many relatives/ancestors of the very name to find out whether there is any link to that particular famous individual. I spent my time doing "the blind search" not knowing which way I should go, which ancestor's descendants - next of keens I should look for. So I did look here and there, trying to trace immediate relatives of that and other person, hoping to find a link to the famous X.

Of course, it happened that all my effort was in vain, I could not find anything. However, in many cases, I did succeed which was quite exciting and rewarding at the same time. It appears many descendants of the first settlers in America were related in one way or another. It seems that in the old days, people of similar social status and heritage kept close together, and families who lived in the same area often happened to intermarry. Anyway, whenever I managed to find a well-known person in our extended family tree, it was a surprise but a great feeling as well.

Our connection to William Barret Travis (yes, I mean the one who defended the Alamo - born on August 9, 1809, in Red Bank, Edgefield District, Saluda County, South Carolina to Mr. Mark Butler Travis and Ms. Jemima Elizabeth Stallworth) is William's second cousin twice removed, Ethel Blair Maddox nee Dudley

What is that connection?

1. Ethel was born on March 20, 1887, in Paris, Lamar County, TX. Her parents were James Gasham Dudley (1848, Marion, MO - 1914, TX) and Jennie Elizabeth Blair (1849, Arkansas - 1896, TX). On April 18, 1911, in Lamar Co., TX Ethel married Mr. Clarence Witherspoon Maddox (March 19, 1881, Murfreesboro, Rutherford, Tennessee - Feb. 1, 1967, Dallas, Dallas Co., TX). Clarence's parents were Thomas Frederick Maddox (1836, TN - 1915, TN) and Amanda Lee Nance (1840, TN - 1908, TN).

2. Ethel's husband Clarence was a direct descendant (7 generations) of William Thornton V (1649, VA  - 1727, VA), who was a brother of Francis Thornton I (1651-1726). It is one of our main family lines.

3. Francis Thronton I's wife was Alice Savage (1651-1695), a cousin of Capt. Hancock "Richard" Lee I (b. 1653-1709), our seven-times-great-great uncle by marriage. His wife Sarah Lee Allerton was our seven-times-great-great aunt.

Yes, I know - a very complicated and distant relation considering William Barrett Travis but still the same family tree. Well, that is not all. I noticed that in the Travis family there was a lady of the name Susannah (1776, NC - 1862, MO) whose married name was Crockett. Ms. Susannah Crockett nee Travis was our Ethel's great-great-aunt. I thought to myself - is it a connection to the Crockett family (meaning Davy Crockett of course)? Obviously, I continued my research here.

What I found out:

1. Susannah Travis mentioned above was William Barrett Travis' father's cousin. To be more detailed, Susannah's father was Mr. Thomas Travis Sr. (born circa 1737, Baltimore, Maryland June - 5, 1837, Wolf River Valley, Pall Mall, Fentress, Tennessee). Thomas Travis Sr.'s brother was Berwick Barrett Travis (circa 1748, Travers Creek, Alamance County, North Carolina - 1812, Mine Creek, Edgefield County, South Carolina), William's grandfather.

2. Susannah married David Crockett (born on June 15, 1780, Limestone, Washington County, TN - died Jan. 21, 1853, Clay Co., MO). That David Crockett was a son of Joseph Louis Crockett (b. circa 1756, Fredericksburg, Virginia - Jul. 28, 1829, Fentress County, TN) and Elizabeth Kinley's (b. circa 1759 - Donegal, Ireland).

3. Susannah's husband David was David Stern Crockett's (Davy Crockett's) cousin as their fathers were brothers. Davy, her cousin, was born on Aug. 17, 1786, Near the Nolichucky River, Present Limestone, Washington County - Present Greene County).

4. Another marriage which connected the two families was the matrimony of Susannah's brother William B. Travis (1783, Maryland - 1858, TN) and Miss Mary Crockett (born circa 1758, Fentress Co., TN - 1860, Travisville, TN). The ceremony took place circa 1857, in Kentucky.
Mary Crockett was David Stern Crockett's cousin. Her father was Robert Crockett (Aug. 13, 1755, Fredericksburg, VA - 1836, Kentucky), David Stern's father's brother.

William Barrett Travis and David Stern Crockett died tragically on March 6, 1836, defending the Alamo and the Republic of Texas. 


Proud of our (distant) ancestors! God bless their souls.



Source:
The information is based on my MyHeritage findings.

Friday, March 2, 2018

Absalom Bobo Gant Jr. and Other Bobos

When I was working on our family tree and got to the name Absolom Bobo, I thought to myself: "Bobo - what a peculiar middle name". The word "bobo" or "bobas" in Polish means a little baby.
When I told my husband about Bobo, he said he would have thought, it would be a name of a funny rodeo clown, not a real person.

In the old days, it happened that somebody's middle name was actually a surname of one of the person's ancestors, most often their mother's. In our case, the only mother of the Bobo surname could have been the wife of our 6 x great-grandfather John Gant (born Feb. 15, 1710, Isle of Wight County, Virginia). According to some researchers, her name was Margaret Bobo, and she was born in 1710, in North Carolina. Some other genealogists question it, as they say, there is no record of such a marriage or a Bobo lady. On the other hand, John Gant's son was called Lewis Bobo Gant (born circa 1758 in Bute, Orange County, NC) so isn't it enough to assume Lewis' mom was Miss Bobo? Besides, several other direct descendants of Lewis Bobo had the same middle name (e.g. his sons Jesse Bobo and Absalom Bobo).

Other Bobos were:

1. Jesse Bobo Gant (our third cousin four times removed) had a son Absolom Bobo (our second cousin five times removed), born on 10 March 1839, in Hardin, Tennessee. By 1880, Absolom moved to Texas with his family. One of Absolom's son was Jessee Bobo, born on Feb. 2, 1866, in Waynesboro, Wayne Co., Tennessee.

2. Lewis Bobo's son Absalom Bobo Gant, born on Feb. 25, 1800, in Abbeville County, NC had eleven children, seven daughters, and four sons. His third son and the fifth child was Absalom Bobo Jr. who was born to Absalom Sr. and his wife Mary Boone on October 30, 1830, in Martin, Weakley County, TN.

Absalom Bobo Jr. received his education in Tennessee where he was also a student of a boy's school and later, Cumberland University at Lebanon. In 1893, Absalom was a justice of the peace in Wayne County. In 1890, having graduated from the university with flying colors, our man moved to Texas where he worked as a teacher in Tarrant County.

During Civil War Absalom Bobo was part of the Ninth Regiment of the Texas Cavalry (Company A). He joined the Company unit as a second lieutenant. Later, in 1892, he was promoted to captain. When he finished his military career, Absalom came back to Texas and became a businessman. He was involved in a pharmaceutical enterprise in Weatherford in Parker County. Afterward, he was in real estate and landowning business.


When I visited Weatherport for the very first time, I had no idea then that our relatives had lived and been buried there. In the picture you can see the Parker County Courthouse in Weatherport, TX which was designed by Wesley Clark Dodson and built (mostly of limestone) in 1884-1886.

Absalom  married when he was 35. His bride was 20-year-old Miss Julia Minerva Raines (born on Sept. 15, 1847, Naclina, Nacogdoches County, Texas to Mr. Charles Baldwin Raines and Ms Mary Ann Pope). The marriage ceremony took place on December 18, 1867, in Rusk, Cherokee County, TX. The couple had eight children:

Charles Boone - born November 6, 1869, in Rusk, TX;
Mary Alice -  b. May 6, 1872, in Rusk, d. Sept. 1, 1873, in Weatherford, TX;
Absalom Bobo - b. July 22, 1874, Weatherport, d. August 16, 1875, Weatherford;
Rutledge Raines - b. January 30, 1875, Weatherford, d. December 22, 1877, Weatherford;
Julia G - born March 9, 1880, Graham, Young, TX;
Irene - born October 9, 1882, Graham;
Ida - born and died June 26, 1885, Graham;
Ada - born July 21, 1888, Graham.

The places where the children were born, show that Absalom Bobo Jr andJulia Minerva moved from Rusk to Weatherport, and then to Graham in Texas.

The Census records made on June 29, 1880*, informed that the family lived in Graham. Absalom had already been a land agent then.


Absolim B Gant - age 47
Julia M Gant - age 34 - wife
Chas B Gant - age 11 - son
Julia Gant - age 2 months - daughter

Absalom Bobo Jr. was quite a figure and a successful entrepreneur. He was a leading local developer and (as I learned reading Texas Online Handbook), he started a salt mine in 1871 and was the county representative to the Twelfth Texas Legislature. At the end of the 1880s, Absalom was also involved in organizing Young County Camp, United Confederate Veterans No. 127.

Absalom Bobo Gant Jr. passed on May 2, 1897, in Graham. He was buried at Oak Grove Cemetery.

Census data of the year 1900** tells that Absalom's wife Julia Minerva (50) lived with their children Chas B (31), Julia (20), Lene (18), and Ada B (12) at Justice Precinct 1 Graham city, Young, Texas.

1903 was the year of two marriages in the family. First, on April 22, Irene married Mr. George H McLaren who was born in Lauderdale County, Alabama on August 10, 1870. 

Texas County Marriage Records, 1837-1965
Name: Geo H McLaren
Titles And Terms: Mr
Event Type: Marriage
Event Date: 22 April 1903
Gender: Male
Event Place: Young, Texas, United States
Spouse's Name: Irene Gant
Spouse's Titles And Terms: Miss
Spouse's Gender: Female
Page: 353

Record Source:
"Texas, County Marriage Records, 1837-1965," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QV1C-5PL5 : accessed 22 March 2018), Geo H Mclaren and Irene Gant, 22 Apr 1903, Marriage; citing Young, Texas, United States, various county clerk offices, Texas State Library and Archives Commission, Texas Dept. of State Health Services and Golightly-Payne-Coon Co.; FHL microfilm 1,783,875. 

Irene's parents-in-law were Mr. James F McLaren and Ms. Nancy Hough of Alabama.

A few months later, on August 16,  Irene's sister Julia married Mr. George M Baynes, born circa 1876. 

Texas County Marriage Records, 1837-1965
Name: George M Baynes
Titles And Terms: Mr
Event Type: Marriage
Event Date: 16 August 1903
Gender: Male
Event Place: Young, Texas, United States
Spouse's Name: Julia Gant
Spouse's Titles And Terms: Miss
Spouse's Gender: Female
Page: 361

Record Source:
"Texas, County Marriage Records, 1837-1965," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QV1C-5PGT : accessed 22 March 2018), George M Baynes and Julia Gant, 16 Aug 1903, Marriage; citing Young, Texas, United States, various county clerk offices, Texas State Library and Archives Commission, Texas Dept. of State Health Services and Golightly-Payne-Coon Co.; FHL microfilm 1,783,875. 

Irene and George had three sons and a daughter: James Bobo (born 1904, died in infancy), Charles Gant McLaren (1904-1982), Irene (1908-1975), and George H Jr. (1912-1939). George H Sr. bereaved the family on Feb. 26, 1912. He passed in Graham. Quite a few years after that, Irene remarried. Her second husband was Mr. Walter Harold McPherson (born in Missouri on March 21, 1872- died in South Bend, Young Co., on Feb.20,1931).

Julia and George Baynes had four children - daughters: Bess (1904-1974), EM Zell (1906-1970), and sons: Absolom Bobo (1909-1964), and Dick E (1912-1992). Mr. Baynes passed when his youngest child was 1, on June 1, 1913.
---
The youngest daughter of Absalom Bobo Jr. and Julia Minerva's, Ada married Carros Baror Logan on Sept. 23, 1908. Her spouse was born on August 8, 1885, in Stevensville, TX. 

Texas County Marriage Records, 1837-1965
Name: C B Logan
Event Type: Marriage
Event Date: 23 September 1908
Event Place: Young, Texas, United States
Gender: Male
Spouse's Name: Ada Gant
Spouse's Gender: Female
Page: 145

Record Source:
"Texas, County Marriage Records, 1837-1965," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QV1C-5R4G : accessed 22 March 2018), C B Logan and Ada Gant, 23 Sep 1908, Marriage; citing Young, Texas, United States, various county clerk offices, Texas State Library and Archives Commission, Texas Dept. of State Health Services and Golightly-Payne-Coon Co.; FHL microfilm 1,783,875. 

Carros' parents were Malvern Hill Logan (born in GA) and Harriet Eliza Davis (born in TX). 

Census 1910*** informs that Ada (21), Carros (24) and their daughter Thesa (0) lived then at Ada's mother Julia (67) in Graham, TX. Charles (40), Ada's brother, also lived with them.

Eight years later, Ada and Carros lived in Oklahoma City at 425 W. 6th Street (Carros'
WW1 draft registration). 

Registration Card
Serial Number: 2892 Order Number: 1505 
Name: Caros Baror Logan
Permanent Home Address: H-425 W 6th St Oklahoma City, Okla. County, Okla.
Age in Years: 33
Date of Birth: August 8 - 1885 -
Race
White: Yes
US Citizen
Native Born: Yes
Present Occupation: Business Insurance
Employer's name: J. A. Lower
Nearest Relative: Ada B. Logan, Adress: 425 W. 6th St Oklahoma City, Coutny: Okla. , State: Okla.
Registrar's Report: 35-3-27-C
Description of Registrant
Height: Medium, Build: Medium, Color of Eyes: Brown, Color of Hair: Dark
Date of Registration: Sept. 12, 1918

Record Source:
"United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KZD6-2WR : 13 March 2018), Carros Baron Logan, 1917-1918; citing Oklahoma City no 1, Oklahoma, United States, NARA microfilm publication M1509 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,851,894.

Apparently, Carros seemed to have some serious legal problems then (I hesitated whether I should include a copy of the document here, but decided not to). Ada's marriage matters must have got complicated as in 1930 Carros (45) lived as a roomer (Census 1930) at Mr. and Mrs. Ellington's place in Graham, TX. 

Record Source:
"United States Census, 1930," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:HGHP-X3Z : accessed 22 March 2018), Corras B Logan in household of Curtis J Ellington, Graham, Young, Texas, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 16, sheet 18B, line 100, family 469, NARA microfilm publication T626 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2002), roll 2413; FHL microfilm 2,342,147. 

Probably Ada and Carros divorced or separated as in WW2 draft registration, the man gave his sister's name (Bert Cowan) who lived in Stevensville as the contact person. 


Registration Card
Serial Number: U 805
Name: Carros Baror Logan
Place of Residence: P.O. Box 823 Stevensville, Erath County, Texas
Mailing Address: Same
Telephone: None
Age in Years: 56
Date of Birth: Aug 8 1885
Place of Birth: Stevensville
State: Texas
Name And Address of Person Who Will Always Know Your Address: Mrs. Bert Cowan, P.O. Box 823 Stevensville, Texas
Employer's Name And Address: American casualty & Life, Dallas, Texas
Place of Employment or Business: Same Dallas, Dallas, Texas
Signature: C.B. Logan

Record Source:
"United States World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XPPX-GZL : 6 November 2017), Carros Baror Logan, 1942; citing NARA microfilm publication M1936, M1937, M1939, M1951, M1962, M1964, M1986, M2090, and M2097 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).


All in all, Ada and Carros' story seemed to have a happy end as I found another marriage certificate of the couple's. The two remarried on November 4, 1950, in Miller, Arkansas, Carros was 65 and Ada was 62.

Name: C B Logan
Event Type: Marriage
Event Date: 04 Nov 1950
Event Place, Miller, Arkansas, United States
Registration Place, Miller County, Arkansas
Residence Place: Graham, Young, Texas
Gender: Male
Age: 65
Birth Year: (Estimated) 1885
Spouse's Name: Ada Logan
Spouse's Residence Place: Graham, Young, Texas
Spouse's Residence City: Graham
Spouse's Residence County: Young
Spouse's Residence State: Texas
Spouse's Gender: Female
Spouse's Age: 62
Spouse's Birth Year: (Estimated) 1888
Page: 245

 Record Source:
"Arkansas, County Marriages, 1837-1957," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N974-M9X : 25 September 2017), C B Logan and Ada Logan, 04 Nov 1950; citing , Miller, Arkansas, United States, county offices, Arkansas; FHL microfilm 1,977,393.


Ada's spouse passed on Jan. 7, 1970 in Graham. He was buried at Oak Grove Cemetery.
---
Charles Boone, the oldest child of Absalom Bobo Jr.'s was a surgeon and served as a doctor during WW1.
He was drafted at the beginning of the war, on December 24, 1917 (he was 1st lieutenant at the Medical Corpus) and honorably discharged in 1919. Charles Boone Gant was awarded the Victory Medal for his service.


Surame: Gant
Christian Name: Charles B.
Born in: Rusk, TX Nov 6/69
Called into active service as: 1 Lt med Corp Dec 24/17 ORC
Organizations and Staff Assignments: 224 Aero Sq to discharge
Principal Station: Kelly Field S San Antonio, Tex; France
Engagements: -
Wounds Received in Action: None
Served Overseas: Mch 28/18 to Dec 23/18
Hon. disch. Mch 5/19 for convienience of the Government, services no longer required
Was reported 0 per cent  disabled on the date of discharge in view of occupation
Remarks: -

Record Source:
"Texas, World War I Records, 1917-1920," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QV18-ZKCV : 9 March 2018), Charles B Gant, 24 Dec 1917; citing Military Service, , , Texas, United States, Texas Military Forces Museum, Austin.


Name: Gant, Charles B
Rank and Organization: 1st Lt. Med. Corps.
Date: Dec 7 1920
Signature of Applicant:  Charles B. Gant
Address: Graham, Texas
Signature of Approving Officer: Isaac Meyers
Rank and designation: 2nd Lt. 1st INF

Record Source:
"Texas, World War I Records, 1917-1920," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QV18-ZKCK : 9 March 2018), Charles B Gant, 07 Dec 1920; citing Military Service, , , Texas, United States, Texas Military Forces Museum, Austin.

 After the war, Charles Boone (51) lived in Graham with his mother Julia M (75), his sister Irene McLaren (37) and her children, son Charles (15), and daughters Irene (11),  and George H (7), (Census 1920****). This record showed me my earlier mistake - I had thought George H was a son of Irene's not a daughter.


Julia Minerva Gant passed away in Graham on January 18, 1926. Thirteen years later,  on October 24, 1939, her son Charles joined her. He was 69. Most probably, he had never married.

Ada Logan left this world on April 11, 1958. Then, in Amarillo on October 8, 1963, it was 83-year-old Julia Gant Baynes. The last child of Absalom and Julia's, Irene McPherson, passed on November 24, 1968, in Tulsa, Tulsa County, Oklahoma.They all were buried at at Oak Grove Cemetery in Graham.

As you can see, there were quite a few Bobos in that family branch, actually 9 including the alleged very first Bobo, wife of John's. Since I found them, the name Bobo means to us more than it had used to. It simply means our Texas keens.

Source:
Records and copies of documents - familysearch.org
Texas State Historical Association
Findagrave.com

* "United States Census, 1880," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MFJL-VYW : 15 July 2017), Chas B Gant in household of Absolim B Gant, Graham, Young, Texas, United States; citing enumeration district ED 167, sheet 377D, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 1334; FHL microfilm 1,255,334.

** United States Census, 1900," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M351-RDV : accessed 1 March 2018), Julia Gant in household of Julia M Gant, Justice Precinct 1 Graham city, Young, Texas, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 162, sheet 6B, family 128, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,241,681.

*** United States Census, 1910," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M2Q8-63D : accessed 1 March 2018), Carras B Logan in household of J M Gant, Graham, Young, Texas, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 267, sheet 1B, family 16, NARA microfilm publication T624 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1982), roll 1595; FHL microfilm 1,375,608.

**** United States Census, 1920," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MC9K-JCT : accessed 1 March 2018), Chas B Gant in household of Irene Mclaren, Graham, Young, Texas, United States; citing ED 170, sheet 1A, line 6, family 1, NARA microfilm publication T625 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1992), roll 1854; FHL microfilm 1,821,854.